Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
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Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
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Oct 18, 2017

In This Issue


Opposing Proposed Design for New Hudson & Charles Building, Hearing Scheduled for Tuesday

Existing condition (top) and proposed (bottom) at 538-544 Hudson

 A new 7-story building is proposed for the site of a disused gas station and an existing 2-story building at 538-544 Hudson Street at Charles Street in the Greenwich Village Historic District. GVSHP finds the proposed design (here) lacking and inappropriate for this corner at the heart of the West Village, and will be asking the Commission to reject it. We urge you to do the same.

Because this site is largely vacant, the Commission will approve a new building here. However the size and design of the proposed building is up to the discretion of the Landmarks Preservation Commission, and must be found appropriate for the site and its surroundings. In this respect GVSHP feels that the large undulating design with projecting metal window frames, a metal-clad penthouse and undifferentiated ground floor is severely lacking.

The time of the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s public hearing on this item, currently scheduled to be heard on Tuesday, will not be set until late Friday; check GVSHP’s webpage on this application here for updates on the scheduling of the hearing.

Urge the Commissioners not to approve the proposed design. The letter's text can also be used as testimony if you attend the hearing scheduled for Tuesday.

 


Hearing for Overwhelming Addition to Historic East Village Rowhouse

Front (l.) and rear (r.) views of proposed addition at 104 East 10th Street

A proposed 2-story addition to the 3 ½ story 19th century rowhouse at 104 East 10th Street (east of 3rd Avenue) in the St. Mark’s Historic District Extension will be heard by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The hearing is scheduled for next Tuesday. GVSHP opposes the proposed addition, which will overwhelm this historic house and destroy the integrity of one of New York’s most intact historic streets.

More than three decades ago, neighbors fought hard to get this house and neighboring 102 East 10th Street added to the St. Mark’s Historic District.  Almost all of the houses in the St. Mark’s Historic District are intact and do not have rooftop additions like the one proposed here. Highly visible, it would destroy the qualities which make this district, the East Village’s very first historic district, so unique.

The time of the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s public hearing on this item, currently scheduled to be heard on Tuesday, will not be set until late Friday; check GVSHP’s webpage on this application here for updates on the scheduling of the hearing.

Urge the Commissioners not to approve the proposed rooftop addition. Text of the letter can also be used as testimony if you attend the hearing scheduled for Tuesday.



Inside Renwick Row: Latest Additions to GVSHP's Historic Image Archive

GVSHP is constantly expanding our Historic Image Archive to provide new insights into our neighborhoods. Our latest addition comes from a generous donor, and offers a unique view of turn-of-the-last century life in a home designed by one of New York’s premier 19th century architects.
 
26 West 10th Street is part of a row of eight Anglo-Italianate row houses at #20-36 West 10th Street built in 1856 and attributed to architect James Renwick, Jr. This “terrace” of brownstone houses was built by James F.D. Lanier and his father-in-law James Winslow. It is believed to be one of only two surviving rows of houses by the celebrated 19th century architect (who also designed St. Patrick’s Cathedral and Grace Church) in all of New York City.

These pictures show the interior of No. 26 and were taken c. 1900 and procured by the residents at the time, the Moir family. The images highlight the home’s high ceilings, ornamental plaster work, original fireplace mantels and over mantel mirrors.

View this collection of images here. Click here to read more about Renwick Row.


 

Greenwich Village's "Founding Father" + more: Additions to GVSHP's Civil Rights Map

GVSHP continues to update our Civil Rights and Social Justice Map with new entries related to the struggles for freedom and equality which took place in our neighborhoods. 

Did you know that the first non-Native American settlers of Greenwich Village and the East Village were Africans?  In 1644 the eleven original slaves brought to New Amsterdam in 1626 (two years after the colony’s founding) managed to secure their freedom, and between 1645 and 1647 were granted land between the Dutch settlement at Manhattan’s southernmost tip and today’s 34th Street.  This “Land of the Blacks” served as a buffer between Europeans and the sometimes hostile Indians, and included the farm of Paolo d’Angola, who in 1645 was granted land around today’s Washington Square, becoming in a sense the “Founding Father” of Greenwich Village.

Find out more about these and other fascinating people, places, events and histories on GVSHP’s Civil Rights and Social Justice Map here.




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Check out the latest posts from Off the Grid, featuring news, research, milestones, opinions and historic information about Greenwich Village, the East Village, and NoHo.

Take Action Today!

We need your help to take action in our communities! Preservation leadership is GVSHP's most important function. Visit our Advocacy page to see the full list of actions you can take today.

 





 

 

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